FOLLOW:
  • Black RSS Icon
  • Black Twitter Icon
  • Black Facebook Icon

September 22, 2019

[Spoiler alert]

When I set about writing this particular blog, I hadn’t realised there were five ‘fields’ in the novel to talk about. I was vaguely thinking about two or three, but it seems they’re more of a theme than that. Each of them were scenes of pivotal moments in Lydia's life.

First, there are the school playing fields at Great Mounts College, where Lydia was saved from the bullies, Madie and Tates. The college and its fields were based on my own college at Hinckley, John Cleveland College, where, it so happens, I overheard the idea that inspired the awful events on the recreation ground later in the same chapter.

Second, that recreation ground. It was based on the real rec behind B...

June 16, 2019

I'm a huge fan of dining scenes in film and literature. Whatever the story, I just want to be right in there with them, enjoying the meal. So, it's no surprise to me that there are several dining scenes in I Am Not Gog. All of the dining locations are based on real eateries and their fictional names have allegorical significance. Let's have a little nibble at the most important ones...

The photo above is of Brookside Fish Bar in Hinckley, which our family used to frequent when I was a child (forty years ago). As far as I can remember, it was Dad's role to fetch the fish supper in his car if we were to indulge. It was like a Mum's night off. When I was a bit older, I'd drop by after school wit...

January 13, 2019

There are two particularly cruel scenes in the novel I Am Not Gog, and the second of them is also quite distasteful. I’m sorry about that, but they were both important to the story and partly based on real events.

The first involves a couple of nasty girls at school: Madie and Tates, the two bullies who set about ripping young Lydia’s false fingernails off. Their names are simple anagrams of two English words. If you want to cheat and see what they are anagrams of, I’ve put the solutions after the space at the bottom of this blog.

As ghastly as the scene is, it actually happened to the real-life person who inspired the character of Lydia. I used to work at one of the social projects she freq...

December 26, 2017

Now I’ve addressed our heroine’s name and what it means, it’s only fair I formally introduce our antagonist, the filthy brute, Alex Basileus-Trapezites.

First name: Alex, after Alexander the Great. This is generally as a type, class, or order, not that particular Macedonian. Although, it does secondarily identify the allegorical theme of the Alexander Romances and all that they bring to the table.

Surname: Basileus-Trapezetes. The simple translation from the Greek is ‘Royalty-Bankers’. The hyphen in any surname, of course, represents the alliance of two different families by marriage. Allegorically, this represents an alliance of two different types, classes, or orders (in history, this ha...

August 11, 2017

Alexander the Great was not a good or nice man. He was an imperialist warmonger. Thousands of innocents died because of his megalomaniac desire to rule the world. Nowadays, he is romanticised by epic Hollywood movies such as Alexander (2004), starring Colin Farrell.

Funnily enough, Alexander has been romanticised throughout history. There is even a body of central Eurasian mythology actually called ‘The Alexander Romances’.

The various versions of these fanciful histories of Alexander the Great have been absorbed and retold by many cultures and peoples across the centuries. Each has reinterpreted them in some way to serve their own agenda, thereby using already highly dubious legends as pr...

July 29, 2017

The surface story of Lydia’s journey is a fun and easy read (with some dark moments), and it is not at all necessary for the reader to even be aware of the complex allegorical scheme behind it in order to enjoy that story on its own terms. However, the allegory is there for enjoyment, too. It’s like a big puzzle for the reader to discover the clues and signposts and figure out what it all might mean when she puts the pieces together. I find that sort of thing stimulating and fun.



The allegory would only be completely obvious to people who are already very clued-up on various subjects. I hope most reasonably bright people with a passing familiarity with those subjects would get something fro...

Please reload

ARCHIVE:
Please reload

SEARCH BY TAGS:
Please reload

This is a repository of insights about the novel I Am Not Gog (and future work). There will be new insights every month or so until we have a full library and nothing is left unexplored. If you came here to find out more about the allegory of the novel, start by clicking HERE.

FOLLOW:
  • RSS feed for this blog
  • Follow on Twitter
  • Follow on Facebook
I Am Not Gog. A novel by Matthew James Hunt.

© 2015-2019 Matthew James Hunt. INKTAP Publishing